About NAAA

NAAA Annual Awards

The deadline to nominate a member for the 2014 NAAA Awards is Sept. 12. The aerial application industry is filled with exceptional individuals who go above and beyond, often with little fanfare. At the 48th Annual Convention & Exposition in Louisville, Ky., NAAA will recognize a new crop of individuals who have made noteworthy contributions to the industry and the Association. Think about the special people you have known and worked with over the years and tell us why they deserve an NAAA Award!

About NAAA

The National Agricultural Aviation Association (NAAA), founded in 1966, represents approximately 1,800 members in 46 states. NAAA supports the interests of small business owners and pilots licensed as professional commercial aerial applicators who use aircraft to enhance food, fiber and bio-fuel production, protect forestry and control health-threatening pests. NAAA provides networking, educational, government relations, public relations, recruiting and informational services to its members and the aerial application industry as a whole.

Membership

The National Agricultural Aviation Association represents the interests of small business owners and pilots licensed as commercial applicators that use aircraft to enhance food, fiber and bio-fuel production, protect forestry and control health-threatening pests.

NAAA Leadership Training Program

The NAAA/Syngenta Leadership Training Program’s goal is to develop strong, knowledgeable leadership in the agricultural aviation industry. The year-long program includes training that enables its participants to clearly communicate the important roles aerial application plays in the production of our country’s agricultural products to the public, media and government. The program has been offered by NAAA and Syngenta Crop Protection Inc. (formerly Zeneca Agricultural Products) since 1995.

Member Benefits

NAAA can help you achieve your goals!

When you become an NAAA member, you are making an important investment in yourself and your business. That holds true whether you have worked in the aerial application industry for decades or have a passion for aviation and agriculture and are interested in becoming a professional ag pilot. The payoff far exceeds what you will spend in dues in the form of effective advocacy, national representation, education and safety programs and the personal connections you will make as you participate in association activities.

History of Agricultural Aviation

In 1921, in an experiment in Ohio, lead arsenate dust was spread over catalpa trees to kill sphinx moth larvae. Under the direction of the Ohio Department of Agriculture, Lt. John A. Macready, a U.S. Army pilot, made the first application with a modified Curtiss JN-6 "Super Jenny." The government then utilized aerial application in the Southern states.

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